All Things Hurricane Week ~ tips, stories

As storms line up in the Atlantic and stream across the Pacific ~~ this is hurricane week on this blog.

When you pass through the waters, I will be with you;
And through the rivers, they will not overflow you.
When you walk through the fire, you will not be scorched,
Nor will the flame burn you. ~ Isiaha 43:2, New American Standard Bible [NASB]

Hurricane 2Hurricane Survival Tips ~ the basics

At Least Two Weeks Before The First Anticipated Hurricane:

  • Create an emergency kit for your home for the duration
    • One gallon of drinkable water per person for seven days
    • Pet food and water for seven days, one leash per dog, pet carriers, litter for two weeks
    • Enough non-perishable food for seven days (manual can opener)
      • paper plates, paper towels, plastic cups, antibacterial wipes
    • Battery operated radio, extra batteries
    • Battery operated lanterns, battery operated candles (not match lit)
    • Freezer packs (and freeze them while you have power)
    • Prescriptions medications
    • Sanitation items (moist wipes, plastic bags for garbage)
    • Personal hygiene items
    • If you need to sandbag your doors or garage, purchase early. They will sell out. Lowe’s, Home Depot, Ace Hardware will sell them.
    • In case you have to go even though you thought you wouldn’t
      • In a sturdy backpack(s). Each family member over 13 should carry a sturdy backpack, preferably water resistant.

        • Important documents (identification, insurance policies, bank account records either stored electronically or in a waterproof container), phone chargers, small battery operated radio
        • first aid kit…with all prescription medications, as well as non-prescription, toothbrush, tooth paste, sanitary needs, antibacterial wipes
        • extra underwear and socks in a plastic bag
        • Telephone book with important numbers, personal calendar
        • Pet license and vaccination records
        • A few hundred dollars in cash or traveler’s checks
    • A cooler(s) to load into the car with food, freezer packs packed with above mentioned food for three days. Don’t forget manual can opener

 

Hurricane 5

Days before the hurricane:

  • Trim all trees near the house
  • Park your car in a secure garage or away from trees
  • Know your evacuation route, and if authorities ask you to leave, do so immediately.
  • If evacuating, load all of the above into your vehicle in the order of importance. Make sure you have the emergency-supply backpack(s) you’ve packed for each person who will carry on.
  • Whether leaving or not, turn your refrigerator and freezer to coldest settings, have freezer packs that you leave in the freezer if the power goes off. If evacuating, have additional freezer packs in a cooler with the food you are taking.
  • Bring in all light weight, loose objects from your yard indoors (patio furniture, garbage cans, etc.)

Hurricane 3

What to bring to a shelter:hat to bring to a shelter:

  • A blanket or sleeping bag for each person, pillows
  • Food and water for three days, eating utensils
  • Additional safety and hygiene items
  • Your emergency-supply backpack(s) with prescription and non-prescription meds, important papers, etc.
  • Flashlights and batteries, games, toys, crossword puzzles, books, magazines

Hurricane 6

Pet friendly shelters:

  • Know where they are located. Do not assume all shelters take pets.
  • Bring your vaccination records
  • All dogs must be collared and leashed and you must have enough poop pickup bags for three days, seriously!
  • All cats must be in a carrier and have a litter box and litter, also sturdy plastic bags for three days to scoop out litter and dispose of it, seriously!
  • Bring food, water, bowls, any meds the animals take
  • Note: The stench of pet waste is nausiating and is a health hazard. Bring what you need to take care of it.

 

CD hurricane(1)

On a lighter note…If you’re in search of a good novel to read during or after your hurricane experience.

It’s hurricane season! Check out COURTING DANGER. A murderer is terrorizing a beach town and so does a fierce hurricane. The case has national security implications giving former US Army Ranger, Dr. Dimitri Garmonin a chance to work with the FBI. It could help him gain funds needed to expand his small Behavior Analysis Unit. He’s unmoved by the chic FBI agent but is intrigued by spunky, newly installed Det. Katerina “Kat” Andruko with whom he shares a Slavic heritage. #99cents all summer.

Magnolia StormsConsider MAGNOLIA STORMS. Maggie Marovich couldn’t save her father or her home from Hurricane Katrina and she’s moved inland, away from the sea. Both her single-parent sister and Josh Bergeron, the ship pilot Maggie once loved,  refuse to leave the Coast. Now a hurricane’s heading directly toward them. Being forced to lean on Josh for help washes up the wreckage in Maggie’s faith. Between the hurricane looming in the Gulf and another gale raging in her heart, can Maggie overcome her past and find the trust to truly live?

Facts About Hurricanes:

  • The word “hurricane” comes from the Taino Native American word, hurucane, meaning evil spirit of the wind.
  • A giant tropical storm is classified as a ‘hurricane once winds go up to 74 miles per hour. That would be Category One hurricane. The highest category considered by the US National Hurricane Center is a Cat 5 with sustained wind speeds greater than 157 miles per hour.
  • Hurricanes form over warm ocean waters near the equator. The warm, moist air above the ocean surface rises, causing air from surrounding areas to be “sucked” in and these winds begin to swirl.
  • The Galveston Category 4 storm of 1900 is perhaps the worst ever seen in the US. The storm landed at 140 mph and brought a 16 foot storm surge. An estimated six to eight thousand people perished. The city’s trolley tracks ripped from their moorings and smashed through buildings like battering rams. Perhaps the most heart-breaking story is that despite the desperate and heroic efforts of ten nuns, all of the nuns and 90 of the 93 children in St. Mary’s Orphanage perished.
National_Hurricane_Center_HSU_desk
National Hurricane Center (NOAA) Desk

 

Where to Go For Hurricane Information:

National Hurricane Center (NOAA)

 

 

 

For I am the Lord your God, who upholds your right hand,
Who says to you, ‘Do not fear, I will help you. ~  Isaiah 41:13New American Standard Bible [NASB]

 

I Came To NE Florida For A Simpler Life ~ reflecting as humongous storm Irma approaches

Beach 1

One and a half years ago, I moved lock stock and pets to Florida from Brooklyn (NYC). I’d lived in the rush, rush, rush of Gotham for over 33 years and was more than tired of it.

I love the Atlantic Ocean and crave being near it. I’d lived in Miami for 2 years, but that was before my marriage to a guy from Brooklyn. Even in Brooklyn, we lived in the Marine Park neighborhood which is only a few miles from the ocean. On days when the wind blew from east-to-west, we could smell the briny, salt air. Loved that. But didn’t love the rush, the mania, the grit in the air that comes along with living in the Big Apple.

Moi, Jax Beach

NE Florida immediately brought serenity, and I craved that after 33 years of a city in constant animation, always busy. Slowly I got rid of my all-black wardrobe (the NYC uniform) and relaxed into what I call a pulled-together beach-bum style.

Hurricane Irma is now 2 – 3 days from its approach to northeast Florida and I went to with my doctor’s referral to get blood drawn this morning. I guess, that qualifies me as a true Floridian. Afterward, on the way home, I so looked forward to a cup of hot coffee. As I drove, I prayed for the houses on my right and left, that angels would protect them from the storm. I prayed for the broader community. Prayer is definitely part of ‘the simple life’ I lead here in Fla.

Yes, I’m preparing. All Floridians are. In my house, preparations are intentionally simple. Simplicity doesn’t mean complacency. Today I’m making sure my freezer is full of ice so that if the power goes out, whatever is in there will keep. I shopped yesterday and didn’t buy anything frozen. Today and tomorrow I’m eating what needs to be cooked. Following a phoned-in tip I heard on the radio from a survivalist, I filled up small plastic containers with water nearly to the top and froze them. This will help keep my entire refrigerator cold (milk, veggies, cold cuts, etc.) if there’s no power long-term. As the water defrosts it can be used to brush teeth, etc.

There is order to simplicity and calm. Am I always calm? No! In the past, I made whining and complaining into an art form. God’s worked a lot on me in that area. I’m also a ‘Plan A, Plan B, Plan C’ type person. I do keep my plans simple. However, I like to know not only what the plan is,  but what the alternate plans are. I’ve learned, however, the Ultimate Plan is God’s plan.

I continue to pray for all those in the path of Hurricane Irma, now considered the biggest and most ferocious storm ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean.

Isaiah 4:6 [NASB] ~  There will be a shelter to give shade from the heat by day, and refuge and [a]protection from the storm and the rain.

Hurricane Matthew Approaches Florida ~ stay safe

hurricane-evac-routeThere’s a light rain outside, but winds have been brisk at times portending what is to come… and that’s Hurricane Matthew. This, they say, is the ‘big one’. I lived through Super Storm Sandy in NYC, so I know what a ‘big one’ can do. Plenty.

 

There is a mandatory evacuation of Jacksonville Beach. Dangerous winds of 55 mph are expected to hit the JAX area tomorrow afternoon. That will be the outer edges of the storm. As the eye comes closer, the winds will increase. They were as much as 110 mph when they hit Haiti, which was devastated. The Bahamas were very hard hit as well. I love the Bahamas, love the people. Have been there twice. Hope to go again. Many of the buildings on these islands are not up to the ‘hurricane code’ we have in Florida.

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Open air street market, very common in the Bahamas. Many homes are small wood framed structures.

There is a steady stream of cars and trucks, some pulling campers, and RVS pulling cars going north on I 95. The entire city of St. Augustine is under mandatory evacuation. ‘They’ are taking this very seriously. Governor Scott has given several press conferences and local mayors have been giving alerts on radio. The weather channels are doing an excellent job.

I spoke to my cousin Lois early yesterday. She lives in Melbourne with her grown daughter. At that time we thought Matthew would land on Daytona Beach, which is about in the middle of where we both live. We bolstered each other’s moods and said we “thought we’d be okay through it.” Now I’ve heard reports Matthew may land in Melbourne and I’m worried for her and her daughter.

I manged to get outside this morning when the rain was light so Sophie could do her business. She’s’ become quite the Florid1an trooper, truckin’ along between the drops. Unfortunately, once inside, I became ‘mean mommy,’ as I’m holding off on breakfast. It’s going to be a long day with winds and rain increasing and she will probably NOT be able to go out this evening, and might not be able to tomorrow morning. I’ve placed plastic covered by towels by the back door in case she has an “accident.”

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I’ve got all necessary gear. Food that doesn’t have to be cooked that will last me more than four days, a good supply of drinking water, plus water for the pets, a hurricane lamp with batteries, a flashlight, candles. I’m as ready as I can be. Now all that’s left for me to do is pray. Has it come to that? [A feeble joke. I’ve been praying right along and will continue to.]

Do not fear, for I am with you; Do not anxiously look about you, for I am your God. I will strengthen you, surely I will help you, Surely I will uphold you with My righteous right hand. ~ Isaiah 41:10, NASB