What I’m Thankful For ~ as a Christian fiction writer

Thankful

Wishing all a blessed Thanksgiving holiday.

First of all, and it almost goes without saying, but must be said, I’m thankful to my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

And I’m thankful for the support of my fellow Christian fiction author friends, mentors, and associates who walk this faith journey, as do I. You all inspire me and help to keep me going, especially on the days when I want to quit.

For those Grace Awards board members who helped me to begin a great adventure in Christian fiction awards. The Grace Awards will undergo changes this year, but we hope will be informative and will continue to expand the tent pegs of Christian fiction.

For The American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) for their writing classes and critique groups most of all. These have helped improve the quality of Christian fiction writing and continues to help maintain high standards. I want to do a shout out to Grace Bridges, who in my first ACFW crit group reigned in an exuberant and totally unskilled writer and taught me about head-hopping and how to write point-of-view correctly, and most of all that fiction writing is a craft that takes time and effort to learn. I mention Grace, not to exclude others, but because I remember myself back then… LOL

For the internet…for all the obvious reasons. For tech companies making laptops smaller so I can more easily cart mine around.

I’m grateful that after over ten years at this writing fiction stuff, I’m still around. Others who entered this racket when I did have quit. I’m grateful that I have a new detective novel that just released, COURTING DANGER.

Blurb:

CD Cover

COURTING DANGER: Taut and compelling detective story, with a national security twist. Dry humor. Sweet, romance. Uplifting.

Newly installed Pelican Beach, Florida detective Katerina “Kat” Andruko fears the prime suspect will get off in the murder of a teen with the help of the department’s forensics psychologist, a man she’s just started to trust.

This case has national security implications that gives former US Army Ranger, Dr. Dimitri Garmonin a chance to work with the FBI. The case could give him the chance to obtain the funds needed to expand his small Behavior Analysis Unit. He’s unmoved by the chic FBI agent sent to assist but is intrigued by Kat with whom he shares a Slavic heritage.

Kat and her partner detain two wrong suspects, giving the department negative press. The predator turns his anger on Kat, targeting her. Can Dimitri use his profiler skills to catch this killer before he hurts the woman he’s growing to love?

Moi, head shot

Bio:

Nike N. Chillemi writes contemporary detective and/or suspense novels with a touch of wry humor, and there’s often a national security twist to them. She likes her bad guys really bad, her good guys smarter and better, and a touch of the comedic. Her newest endeavor is COURTING DANGER.

Nike is the founding board member of the Grace Awards and its Chair, a reader’s choice awards for excellence in Christian fiction. She has been a judge in the 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016, and 2017 Carol Awards in the suspense, mystery, and romantic suspense categories; and an Inspy Awards 2010 judge in the Suspense/Thriller/Mystery category. Her four novel Sanctuary Point series (out of print), set in the mid-1940s has finaled, won an award, and garnered critical acclaim. The first novel in the Veronica “Ronnie” Ingels/Dawson Hughes series HARMFUL INTENT won in the Grace Awards 2014 Mystery/Romantic Suspense/Thriller/Historical Suspense category. She has written book reviews for The Christian Pulse online magazine. She is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW) and John 3:16 Marketing Network.  https://nikechillemi.blog/

Purchase COURTING DANGER on Amazon

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Personal Branding ~ A Must For Authors

Nike, Boca Raton

 

A few of the authors in my American Christian Fiction Writers North East Zone Group have been kicking around topics such as taglines and platform. This made me think of personal branding. In today’s world, is an author a brand? I think, yes!

 

 

Moi 2In the marketplace, it’s human beings who call to us and the heartbeat of social media is human beings. Like it or not, your readers are also your fans.  The author must have a loyal following.

Writers might argue (and so might some readers) that the story is alive. It’s the book that need the following. However, it’s the author who has the real heartbeat. And heartbeat is important. It’s the human factor that attracts in marketing. You can’t just throw a book at someone. You have to engage them.

 

 

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When I interview writers on my blog, I often ask them to send a “personal” photo that’s related to one of the answers in the interview. This would be a photo other than their book cover and their head shot. And I try to ask at least one interview question about their lives in general that would lend itself to providing that photo. Quite often the interview answers come back to me without that personal photo. It’s my contention that authors become much more interesting if they allow readers a peek into their lives. Almost everything in our lives contributes to our writing, so there has to be a myriad of small things we can share with readers that don’t fall into the “too much info” category.

 

Harmful Intent 2Taglines are important. I’ve got two of them.

  • Literature that reads like pulp fiction
  • I like my bad guys really, really bad; and my good guys smarter and better

I think authors need at least one. The tag line should be at the top of their web page and blog. They should mention it frequently in marketing.

 

 

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I often include photos of myself with animals because I love critters and because they’re featured in several of my whodunits.

Writing is personal and the author’s image online should also be personal, without becoming too intimate. Authors shouldn’t cross that too much information line. There’s something amazing about being able to master language and write 80K, 90K or 120K words and have those words come out in the form of an exciting novel. Authors are not no-talent reality show personalities.  So, while in marketing, we want to come across as totally human, we must do that without disclosing the most private parts of our lives to the public.